Author Archives: Dennis LaRosa

Discount Plan Organization (DPO): What is it and why should we know?

A “Discount Medical Plan Organization” was created in 2004 and is now simply called a “Discount Plan Organization (DPO).”

What is it and why should we know?

It is like a concierge medical agreement where a patient pays a fee, for example, $1,500/year to get quick access to a specific doctor.  Usually, the DPO is the only way to access specific practitioners.  It does little more than grant access, some prophylactic treatment, and the practitioners are usually the patients’ primary care physician.  You may see these organizations providing post-accident services.

Let’s make sure we are not also paying for the DPO in disguise through administrative CPT’s. Click here for the Bill Analysis.

Summary:

Discount Medical Plan Organizations (DMPOs) offer discount medical plans, in exchange for fees, dues, charges, or other consideration, which provide access for plan members to providers of medical services and the right to receive medical services from those providers at a discount. The Legislature established the regulatory scheme for DMPOs in 2004, which includes licensure, forms and rate filings and approval, disclosure requirements, and penalties.

CS/HB 577 renames a “Discount Medical Plan” and a “Discount Medical Plan Organization” as a “Discount Plan” and a “Discount Plan Organization” (DPO), and makes extensive conforming changes to part II of ch. 636, F.S., to reflect the new names. The bill clarifies the definition of a “Discount Plan” to exclude any plan that does not charge a fee to members. The bill removes all rate and form filing and approval requirements for DPOs. To increase flexibility in marketing and reduce administrative barriers for DPOs, the bill:

  • Defines “first page”, upon which certain disclosures must appear, to mean the first page of any marketing material that first includes information describing benefits;
  • Allows DPOs to delegate functions to marketers and binds DPOs to the actions of those marketers within the scope of the delegation; and
  • Allows marketers and DPOs to commingle certain information on forms, advertisements, marketing materials, or brochures.

To maintain consumer protections for members and potential members of Discount Plans, the bill:

  • Changes the disclosure requirements by requiring acknowledgement and acceptance of the disclosures before enrollment and creating visibility and follow up requirements for disclosures made by electronic means or telephone;
  • Establishes new cancellation and reimbursement requirements for DPOs to disallow any charges beyond the effective cancellation date;
  • Requires pro rata reimbursement of charges paid by a member for the months beyond the effective cancellation date; and
  • Requires pro rata reimbursement for members who cancel during an open enrollment period, upon return of his or her discount card.

The bill does not have a fiscal impact on state or local government.

The bill became law on June 14, 2017, and is now Chapter 2017-112, Laws of Florida.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss this issue in greater detail, please feel free to contact Dennis LaRosa (dlarosa@roiglawyers.com/850-264-6389) or any ROIG Lawyers attorney of your choice.

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Filed under FL Legislation, Florida, Insurance, Insurance Defense

New Amendments Affecting Anti-Fraud Investigative Units

The Legislature has passed some amendments that are likely to affect your SIUs. We have reviewed the new law and would like to provide you with a summary of some of the most important points.

Chapter 2017-178, Laws of Florida, primarily amended § 626.9891, Florida Statutes and went into effect June 26, 2017, when the Governor signed the bill. These amendments deal with insurer “anti-fraud investigative units.” There is very little, if anything, that must be done now other than learn the law and know what your responsibilities and timelines are.

Although you have an SIU to cover the main features of the law, some new reporting requirements and designation of an anti-fraud unit with at least 2 hours of initial anti-fraud education and 1 hour per year after that, will require all insurers “to investigate and report possible fraudulent insurance acts” to Florida government. The amendments to § 626.9891 [insurer anti-fraud investigative units; penalties for noncompliance], Florida Statutes, provide the who, what, how, when and where.

SUMMARY

*There is no legislative staff analysis of this law

By December 18, 2018, DIFS shall create best practices for the detection, investigation, prevention, and reporting of insurance fraud and other fraudulent insurance acts. The report must be updated as necessary but at least every 2 years. The report must contain specified criteria set forth in the section.

The Department of Financial Services is authorized to create rules for the administration this section. This is neither the Office of Insurance Regulation nor the Financial Services Commission (Governor and selected cabinet).

While there are compliance dates for insurers and agencies, the bill became effective upon becoming a law on June 26, 2017. By December 31, 2017, each insurer must:

  • If not in-house, contract with others to provide anti-fraud services
  • Adopt anti-fraud plan (discussed below)
  • Designate at least one employee to provide these services
  • Electronically submit reports of anti-fraud plan with the name and contact information of designated person to DIFS
  • The additional cost to the insurer for compliance may be added as an administrative expense in rate requests

Each anti-fraud plan shall include:

  • Procedures for mandatory reporting of insurance fraud
  • Acknowledgement that the insurer provides education and training required by section
  • Description of anti-fraud education and training
  • Description or flow chart of anti-fraud unit
  • Rationale and justification for level of staffing and resources used by anti-fraud unit based upon specified criteria

By December 31, 2018, each insurer shall provide staff of the anti-fraud investigative unit at least 2 hours of initial anti-fraud training that is designed to assist in identifying and evaluating instances of suspected fraudulent insurance acts in underwriting or claims activities.

Annually, after the initial training, an insurer must provide such employees a 1-hour course that addresses detection, referral, investigation, and reporting of possible fraudulent insurance acts for the types of insurance lines written by the insurer.

The insurer shall report to DIFS specified information by December 19, 2019, and annually thereafter for each line carried:

  • Number of policies in effect
  • Amount of premiums written
  • Number of claims received
  • Number of claims referred to anti-fraud unit
  • Number of fraud related matters referred to anti-fraud unit that were not claim related
  • Number of cases referred to DIFS
  • Number of case referred to other LE agencies
  • Number of cases referred to other agencies
  • Estimated dollar exposure submitted to DIFS or other agencies

In addition to reporting for all lines, workers compensation lines shall also report by December 19, 2019, the following information:

*This is a decrease in the amount of information currently required for workers compensation fraud before the amendment

  • Estimated dollar amount lost due to workers comp fraud]
  • Estimated dollar amount recovered attributed to workers comp fraud for several designated criteria
  • Number of workers comp fraud cases referred to DIFS for several designated criteria

Creating § 626.9896 Dedicated insurance fraud prosecutors:

  • DFS shall collect specified data from each state attorney who has designated attorneys and paralegals exclusively for the prosecution of insurance fraud.  [criteria omitted]
  • DIFS shall report the data to the house and senate leaders by September 1, 2018, and annually after that.

Other provisions not discussed; viatical contracts; HMO anti-fraud unit requirements; stranger-originated insurance policies are now statutorily considered void and unenforceable; an insurer may opt out of preinsurance inspection of private motor vehicles.  Preinsurance inspection reports of DIFS are eliminated.

 

These are the highlights of the bill as it applies to automobile insurance.  It does affect other lines as mentioned and we would be happy to explain the law in greater detail should you request it. If you have any questions, suggestions or reservations, please do not hesitate to contact us so that we may assist you in not only understanding the new law but how it ought to be implemented and when.

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Filed under FL Legislation, Florida, Florida Division of Insurance Fraud, Insurance, Insurance Claims, Insurance Defense, Insurance Fraud

Updates to Florida’s Fictitious Name Statute

We get questions regarding the Fictitious Name Statute from many of you fairly often. The legislature has made some changes to the Fictitious Name Statute that closes holes, but quite possibly opens some new ones. Whether this creates a private cause of action to enforce the new provisions (affirmative litigation) is to be seen. However, it may provide a defense. Click here for the Bill Analysis and Fiscal Impact Statement.

A summary of the new changes can be found below. If you have any questions or would like to discuss this issue in greater detail, please feel free to contact ROIG Lawyers Healthcare Policy Advisor Dennis LaRosa at dlarosa@roiglawyers.com or (850) 264-6389.

CS/CS/SB 346 updates the Florida Fictitious Name Act, s. 865.09, F.S., which requires any person or business entity doing business in Florida under a name other than their legal name to register a fictitious name with the Division of Corporations of the Department of State. Specifically, the bill:

  • Defines the term “registrant” to clarify and standardize who is required to file a fictitious name;
  • Clarifies that foreign business entities must be in active status with the Division of Corporations to file a fictitious name;
  • Updates the process for cancellation, registration, and renewal of a fictitious name, including clarifying the term of registration;
  • Standardizes language to include varied business entities, rather than just corporations;
  • Changes the penalty for failure to comply with the Fictitious Name Act from a misdemeanor to a noncriminal violation; and
  • Makes technical and conforming changes throughout.

The bill takes effect on July 1, 2017.

Click here for the Amended Bill.

ROIG Lawyers is a minority-owned litigation firm with a primary focus on Insurance Defense Litigation. We serve as primary counsel for numerous national and regional carriers and corporations related to all aspects of insurance litigation. ROIG Lawyers does not intend to create an attorney-client relationship by offering this information, and anyone’s review of the information shall not be deemed to create such a relationship. You should consult a lawyer with regard to specific legal issues that require attention.

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Filed under FL Legislation, Florida, Florida Fictitious Name Act