Category Archives: Auto Insurance Fraud

UPDATE: Naples Man in Florida Crash Ring Sentenced to 3 Years in Jail

On May 2, 2017, the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud reported that Wisler Cyrius of Naples was sentenced to three years in federal prison after pleading guilty of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and money laundering.

Cyrius and five other individuals conspired to solicit people to participate in staged motor vehicle accidents in exchange for compensation. According to the Justice Department, Cyrius was also ordered by the court to pay restitution to automobile insurance companies and to forfeit property in the amount of the proceeds traceable to the offense.

Click here to view the full article. (Previous post)

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Filed under Auto Insurance Fraud, Florida, Insurance, Insurance Fraud

Geico Sues Florida Health Clinic for ‘Unnecessary’ Massage Claims

As reported by Law360, Geico sued Medical Wellness Services Inc. of Miami, FL for allegedly making $1.2 million in claims for providing medically unnecessary treatments for automobile accident victims who were eligible for coverage under their no-fault insurance policies. According to Geico, some of the claims were for services that were not actually provided and contained billing codes that misrepresented and exaggerated the services.

“The defendants do not now have — and never had — any right to be compensated for the fraudulent services that were billed to Geico through Medical Wellness,” Geico said. Geico claims Medical Wellness Services Inc. submitted claims for massage therapist services which are not reimbursable because Florida law prohibits no-fault insurance reimbursement for massages or other similar services.

According to the suit, the scheme began no later than 2013 and continues to this day. In addition to the request for $1.2 million in damages, Geico is also requesting a declaration from the court saying it will not have to pay any pending fraudulent claims by the health clinic which totals more than $75,000.

Click here for the full story (subscription required).

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Filed under Auto Insurance Fraud, Florida, Insurance, Insurance Claims, Insurance Defense, Insurance Fraud, Miami-Dade County, Miami-Dade Fraud, Personal Injury Protection, PIP/No Fault

UPDATE: Sixth Person Found Guilty in Unlicensed Chiropractic Clinics Scam

A Naples man convicted of committing mail fraud back in September of 2016 has been sentenced to 14 years in prison. According to the Naples Daily News, Nesly Loute, was also ordered to pay restitution of almost $2.15 million to the insurance companies.

Loute and five others plead guilty and were convicted of operating five unlicensed chiropractic clinics and fraudulently billing auto insurers for Personal Injury Protection benefits.

Click here to view the full article. (Previous post)

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Filed under auto insurance, Auto Insurance Fraud, Florida, Insurance Fraud, Personal Injury Protection, PIP, PIP/No Fault, Unlicensed Clinics

Trooper Fired and Arrested for Helping Friend Cover Up Crash

Florida Highway Patrol Trooper David Casillas was arrested on Tuesday, February 28th and charged with organized fraud, filing a false insurance claim and official misconduct after trying to help a friend cover up a traffic crash that occurred in June of 2015. FHP fired Casillas in January as a result of the investigation which lasted over a year.

During the investigation, it was discovered that Casillas had written a false report for a bogus insurance claim submitted by his friend, dentist Jesus Del Valle. The insurance claim was submitted as a result of damage the dentist had done to his vehicle when he sideswiped a landscaping crew and kept driving.

Del Valle’s crash left Yoel Montero, a gardener with Lewis Tree Service, with a traumatic head injury and severe injuries to his right leg. The false insurance claim alleges that the accident happened a week later than it actually happened and that he had crashed the SUV into a palm tree instead of a landscaping crew.

The key to breaking the case was the fact that Del Valle’s 2015 Land Rover needed a new passenger-side mirror which could only be ordered from Range Rover manufacturers. Only one such had been sold in that time period and it was to Del Valle’s mechanic (and friend) Ariel Perera who performed the repair on his vehicle. Perera also allegedly submitted inflated invoices to Del Valle’s insurance company as well as charged the company for replacement parts that were never actually replaced. He is also facing charges with Del Valle and Casilla.

Click here to read the full story.

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Filed under Auto Insurance Fraud, Florida, Insurance, Insurance Fraud, Miami-Dade County

Will You Have Coverage When You Cross The Line?

Is an automobile insurance company required to extend Florida Personal Injury Protection (PIP) benefits to an insured who resides in another state?

Well yes and no.

An automobile insurer who sells automobile insurance policies in Florida and the nonresident insured’s state is required to extend the minimum Florida Personal Injury Protection (PIP) benefits of $10,000.00 to the insured if they are involved in a motor vehicle accident in Florida, but only if they qualify under Florida law.

To qualify, the nonresident insured’s vehicle must have been physically located in Florida for 90 nonconsecutive days out of the previous 365 days from the date of the accident. By nonconsecutive days, it means that the insured vehicle could leave Florida and re-enter and still qualify for Florida PIP benefits if the vehicle has been in Florida for longer than 90 days throughout that preceding year.

An insurer is not required to extend the $10,000.00 in Florida PIP benefits to a nonresident insured whose vehicle is not in Florida for longer than 90 nonconsecutive days out of the previous 365 days from the date of the accident.

Most if not all automobile insurance policies have an “Out-of-State Coverage” provision which will detail that insurer’s obligation to comply with a State’s minimum insurance requirements if their nonresident insured becomes subject to the insurance laws of that State. However, some insurance contracts make it the responsibility of the nonresident insured and not the insurer to purchase the required minimum Florida PIP coverage if they plan to stay in Florida for longer than 90-days.

An insurer is not required to extend additional Florida PIP benefits to a nonresident insured that enters Florida and whose insurance policy meets the States minimum PIP or No-Fault requirements.

For Example:

The New York Automobile No-Fault Law requires each insured to carry a minimum of $50,000.00 in No-Fault/ PIP benefits. Thus, if a New York resident drives their vehicle into Florida and is involved in a motor vehicle accident, then they will receive the $50,000.00 in New York PIP benefits as this is greater coverage than the minimum $10,000.00 in PIP benefits which is required under Florida law.

This article is not intended to create an attorney-client relationship by offering this information, and anyone’s review of the information shall not be deemed to create such a relationship. The content provided is intended to provide information of general interest to the public and is not intended to offer legal advice about specific situations or problems. You should consult a lawyer with regard to specific law issues that requires attention.

For additional information please contact Stephen Mellor of Roig Lawyers at 954-354-1541 or by email at smellor@roiglawyers.com.

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Filed under Auto Insurance Fraud, Florida, Insurance, Insurance Claims, Personal Injury Protection, PIP/No Fault

Brother Duo Accused of Massive Insurance Fraud Scheme

According to Law360, on January 3rd in a 427-page state court complaint the New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance (DOBI) and Allstate Insurance Co. have accused brothers Anhuar and Karim Bandy of masterminding a massive personal injury insurance fraud scheme in which they recruited automobile accident victims for file claims for treatment. There were several law firms and health care providers involved in the schemes as well.

The Bandy brothers had previously pled guilty in July 2015 to organizing an insurance fraud scheme in which they recruited auto accident victims as patients for their clinics and received kickbacks from attorneys and medical professionals for patient referrals.

This recent complaint against the Bandy brothers detailed a series of alleged overlapping schemes that date back to their previous conviction. DOBI Commissioner Richard J. Badolato explained, “These and similar alleged fraudulent activities increase the cost of insurance to consumers.” While DOBI is seeking a fine against the Bandy brothers, Allstate is seeking reimbursement for paid benefits paid on behalf of its customers.

Click here to view the full story (subscription required).

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Filed under Auto Insurance Fraud, Insurance Fraud, Personal Injury Protection

Florida Supreme Court Allstate Fee Schedule Litigation: Shall We Read The Tea Leaves?

The Florida Supreme Court recently heard oral argument in Allstate Insurance Company v. Orthopedic Specialists, No. SC15-2298. At issue was an appeal of a ruling that it wrongfully limited its reimbursements under Medicare fee schedules for motorists’ personal injury protection (PIP) claims.

Allstate’s policy language has been found to be exceedingly clear and concise by the majority of appellate courts across the state. A ruling affirming the Fourth District Court of Appeals decision would only serve to blindside Florida’s citizens with additional bills for costly co-payments while also limiting the amount of coverage available to them.

While we wait for a final opinion, industry professionals have been closely watching the court for any and all clues. Politics of the high court aside, what “shall” we analyze to determine how the justices will rule?

One such clue seems to be overlooked, yet is hiding in plain sight. On the very day that the court heard oral argument in Allstate v. Orthopedic Specialists the court issued a Per Curiam Opinion amending the Florida Rules of Civil Procedure in which the word “shall” was stricken over 200 times. See In Re: Amendments to the Florida Rules of Civil Procedure No. SC16-155. Ironically and perhaps persuasively, the court writes unanimously that “[t]he amendments shall become effective January 1, 2017, at 12:01 a.m.” (emphasis mine.)

More recently, numerous Per Curiam Opinions amending various procedural and administrative rules have been issued. They have seen the court continue to favor “shall”. Amendments to the Rules of Criminal Procedure, Rules of Appellate Procedure, Code of Judicial Conduct and Small Claims Rules did not remove any “shall” provisions.

Pouring over minor amendments by the high court with no clear answer, perhaps we are left to channel Judge May’s epic dissent in the Fourth District Court of Appeals Opinion in which she found Allstate’s policy language to be unambiguous and compliant. While accusing the medical providers of leading the majority down the yellow brick road she writes frustratingly, “As the Pope once asked Michelangelo during the painting of the Sistine Chapel: “When will there be an end?”

We “shall” know soon.

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Filed under Auto Insurance Fraud, FL Legislation, Florida, Florida Supreme Court, Fourth District Court of Appeals, Insurance, Insurance Claims, Personal Injury Protection

Sixth Person Found Guilty in Unlicensed Chiropractic Clinics Scam

According to Southwest Florida Online News, a federal jury found Nesly Loute guilty of fraud after a six day trial where he and five others testified that they had conspired to operate five unlicensed chiropractic clinics and fraudulently billing auto insurers for Personal Injury Protection benefits. This ruling was the culmination of a two-year law enforcement investigation dubbed Operation Fraudulent Pain.

Loute and five other individuals who have also pleaded guilty are facing a maximum penalty of 20 years each in federal prison and must make restitution to the insurance companies they have defrauded. The unlicensed chiropractic clinics had received more that $2 million in fraudulent PIP payments.

Click here to view the full story.

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Filed under Auto Insurance Fraud, Florida, Insurance Fraud, PIP/No Fault, Uncategorized

GEICO Files RICO Suit Alleging Windshield Repair Fraud

A federal lawsuit filed by GEICO on June 9 provides an inside look at an elaborate windshield repair fraud scheme.

The suit, filed in the Middle District of Florida, makes claims of fraud, unjust enrichment and RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act) violations against at least two companies and their owners.

The complaint explained the scheme as follows:

A company called Cornerstone Mobile paid kickbacks to car dealerships and car wash companies to work off their properties. Cornerstone would offer to fix even the slightest damage to windshields for free. It would obtain the car owner’s insurance information and, more importantly, the owner’s signature to transfer assignment of benefits. Sometimes, GEICO alleges, the Cornerstone owners would steal insurance information from glove boxes of cars and forge the owners’ signature.

Eventually, Cornerstone Network was incorporated. The two entities had separate tax identification numbers but operated in an identical manner. GEICO says the two companies were used in hopes of reducing the number of fraudulent claims from Cornerstone Network alone, and thus avoid detection. Both companies claimed to do windshield repairs, but neither had a physical address—one was just a post office box in Tavernier.

Once Cornerstone got insurance information from automobile owners, the employees used a liquid formula from a window repair kit to coat over cracks and chips. Afterward, Cornerstone charged GEICO and other insurers for a full windshield replacement. The complaint alleges that Cornerstone would wait two to four weeks to file for reimbursement. Florida law allows insurers 30 days to make windshield replacement reimbursements, meaning GEICO was rushed to pay the claims on time and didn’t have a chance to investigate them.

GEICO presented exhibits showing more than 600 fraudulent windshield claims from each Cornerstone company, costing GEICO in excess of $223,000.

The case is Government Employees Insurance Company, et al. v. Jason Fry, et. al.

Click here for full story.

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Filed under Auto Insurance Fraud, Florida, Florida Division of Insurance Fraud, Insurance, Insurance Fraud, Middle District of Florida, Windshield Damage Scam

Auto Insurance Fraud Comes in All Shapes and Sizes

A recent study by the auto insurance industry reveals that fraud costs the industry $50 billion each year. And with that much money at stake, the criminals can get pretty creative.

South Florida law enforcement used “Operation Cold Call” last year to bust up a personal insurance protection (PIP) fraud ring that used chiropractors, lawyers and clinic employees. Undercover agents infiltrated the ring over a year’s time, uncovering a network of con artists who recruited and paid people to lie about injuries and the healthcare they received after crashes. But fake injuries are pretty tame compared to two other schemes mentioned in the report:

  • The Montana License Plate Scam: Montana has no sales tax or use taxes on vehicles. In this scheme, an unscrupulous attorney in Montana helps out-of-staters create a limited liability company in Montana. Then that LLC is used to buy an expensive sports car or recreational vehicle. The vehicle is taken back to the LLC owner’s home state, and technically, the owner is driving a “company car” with Montana plates. But if there is a wreck, theft or weather damage, the auto insurance company may cancel the policy or deny the claim due to violation of insurance and registration laws within the driver’s home state.
  • The Hot Wheels Ruse: One insurance company had a customer make a claim for parts stolen from the customer’s vehicle. Everything appeared legit at first, until investigators took a closer look at the photos submitted with the claim. The photos were actually extreme close-ups of a toy car, but at least the toy car was the same make and model as the customer’s real car.

Click here to read the entire story.

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Filed under Auto Insurance Fraud, Insurance