Tag Archives: uninsured motorists

Cape Coral Cracks Down on Drivers without Insurance

Representatives from the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB), the local police department, and 17 state and national auto insurance carriers conducted an insurance crackdown in Cape Coral, Fla. on Tuesday, March 17. More than 35 police officers split into three groups, all on the lookout for uninsured motorists and motorists with fraudulent insurance.

The officers pulled over speeders and drivers not wearing their seatbelts, and then checked whether they had valid proof of insurance in hand. Drivers who were stopped for speeding or being unbuckled, but had valid paperwork available, could be let go with a warning. At the end of the day, officers had given out 230 written warnings and 68 uniform traffic citations, 15 of which were for no proof of insurance.

“We try to do an operation like this at least once a year,” Cape Coral Police Department spokesman Sgt. Dana Coston said. While the officers pulled over drivers, the NICB and dozens of insurance representatives were back at the police station, working directly with the officers to verify coverage.

A common scheme, Sgt. Coston explained, is for an individual to apply for auto coverage, get the paperwork, cancel the insurance, and then use the now-invalid insurance card as proof of coverage. Officers usually have to rely on state data, which is often outdated, to verify coverage, but because officers had “real time” access to insurance representatives on Tuesday, they could confirm on the spot if the insurance coverage was valid.

Sgt. Coston was heartened by the results of the day’s work. “Seeing that [only] about 5 percent of the drivers had any type of problem when stopped today is very encouraging. That’s probably one of the highest rates of compliance we’ve seen in years.”

Coston went on to explain that, because it is likely that at least some of those ticketed will show up in court with their missing paperwork, “the rate of compliance is actually even higher than the 95 percent we saw today.”

As for those who continue to drive without insurance or with fraudulent insurance? “They’ll get caught eventually, it’s just kind of rolling the dice,” said Cape Coral Police Sergeant Jon Kulko.

Cape Coral, Fla. is located on the Gulf Coast in Lee County, just south of Fort Myers.

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Filed under Insurance Fraud

Hialeah Police Crack Down on Drivers with Fake Insurance Cards

On February 12, 2015, authorities in Hialeah, Hialeah Gardens, and Medley clamped down on drivers carrying fake insurance cards, according to a news report on CBS Miami.

Officers stopped randomly-selected cars and asked drivers for their license, registration, and proof of insurance. Police then contacted the insurance companies to verify coverage. If the card turned out to be fraudulent, the driver was arrested.

Two drivers were arrested for carrying fake insurance cards, while 27 other arrests were made for various traffic violations.

According to the National Insurance Crime Bureau, the use of fake insurance cards has become a national epidemic.  “If you have a printer and you have a computer, you can download a fake insurance card and it looks real,” said Hialeah Police spokesman Carl Zogby.

The use of fake or fraudulent insurance cards affects legal Florida drivers when an uninsured driver is involved in a motor vehicle accident, according to the report. The costs incurred in these accidents are eventually passed on to legal drivers in the form of higher insurance rates.

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Filed under Fla. Stat. 627.736 (2012), Insurance Fraud

Driving in Florida May Be Hazardous to Your Wallet, New Study Finds

You don’t want to have a car accident in Florida, according to a new study released by WalletHub last week. Their numbers ranked states on how ‘safe’ it is for drivers’ finances after an accident. The study placed Florida dead last among 50 states and the District of Columbia—which means driving in the Sunshine State can be risky to your wallet.

In producing the rankings, WalletHub looked at whether drivers had insurance and whether that insurance would be enough to cover the damages in the event of a car accident. They found significant differences between states. Specifically, the study took into account available car liability insurance to protect others, other forms of required insurance to protect drivers, and the percentage of uninsured drivers in each state.

When those three factors come together, Florida holds the dubious distinction of being the “worst state to get into a car crash,” WalletHub says. Here’s why:

  1. Insurance requirements in Florida are lower than in most other states. Florida drivers are only required to carry minimum liability coverage of $10,000 per person. The amount goes up to a $20,000 minimum for accidents involving multiple parties. By comparison, Maine and Alaska—the states ranked highest—both require $50,000 in coverage up to two people and $25,000 in property damage insurance, according to WalletHub.
  2. A high percentage of Florida drivers are uninsured. According to the study, 23.8 percent of drivers carry no auto insurance. Florida is only surpassed by Oklahoma, which has 25.9 percent uninsured drivers on the road. The best state where drivers have coverage is Massachusetts—only 3.9 percent of their drivers are uninsured
  3. Florida does not require additional forms of insurance coverage to protect drivers. Although Florida does require personal injury protection (PIP) coverage, the state does not require medical payment coverage or uninsured motorist coverage for bodily injuries or personal damage.

What can Florida drivers do? Experts recommend spending a few extra dollars to add uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage to your auto insurance policy to offer protection.

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Filed under Insurance Fraud

Uninsured Drivers Caught by Broward Sheriff’s Fraudulent Insurance Verification Operation

Recently, some uninsured motorists driving in Broward County were in for a real revelation. On September 17, law enforcement officers worked traffic stops and were able to verify insurance coverage on-the-spot that day, much to the surprise of drivers.

The operation, known as the Fraudulent Insurance Verification Operation or FIVO, was conducted by the Broward Sheriff’s Office in conjunction with 30 insurance investigators who had instant access to their client databases. Setting up command central at the Tamarac BSO, the investigators provided real-time insurance information to police officers throughout the county for the day, according to a story in Tamarac Talk.

As a result of using this proactive strategy against insurance fraud, a total of 460 vehicle stops were conducted resulting in 563 citations and seven arrests, the Florida Department of Insurance Fraud reported.

Participating in FIVO were: Allstate, Assurant, Bristol West, Direct General, Esurance, Farmers, Gainsco, Geico, Imperial Fire, Infinity, Mapfre, Mercury, MetLife, National General, Nationwide, Security General, Sentry, State Farm, Travelers, USAA and Windhaven.

The Coalition Against Insurance Fraud says that Florida ranks fifth highest in the nation for uninsured motorists, which is estimated to cost each family about $950 a year. Under Florida law, anyone presenting a fraudulent proof of motor vehicle insurance has committed a third-degree felony.

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Filed under Fla. Stat. 627.736 (2008)

Uninsured Motorists Declining but Still a Concern in Florida, New Study Finds

A new study released by the Insurance Research Council (IRC) found that the estimated percentage of uninsured motorists has been in decline since 2010. According to the organization’s latest report, “Uninsured Motorists, 2014 Edition,” 14.9 percent of drivers were uninsured in 2003, but that figure dropped to 12.6 percent in 2012. That’s about one in eight drivers on the road who are uninsured, according to the study’s most recent data.

The study’s numbers were figured based on a ratio of insurance claims made by individuals who were injured by uninsured drivers to claims made by those who were injured by drivers who had insurance.

Although there is an overall downward trend nationwide, the IRC has broken the percentages down by numbers for each state and discovered great variation. Nationally, the number of uninsured drivers peaked at 29.9 million in 2009 and moderately declined to 29.7 million in 2012.

In terms of states, Florida ranked second in the highest total number of uninsured drivers with 3.2 million. California ranked highest with 4.1 million, while Texas followed Florida with 1.6 million, the report found.

The study also revealed that Florida ranked high in terms of the estimated percentage of uninsured motorists per state. That number is highest in Oklahoma at 26%, followed by Florida (24%) and then, Mississippi (23%).

The “Uninsured Motorists” study also analyzed the total number of uninsured motorist claim payments and found that amount has climbed drastically in spite of an overall drop in the number of uninsured drivers.

Not counting fatalities and total permanent disability claims, the IRC estimates that $2.6 billion was paid in the U.S. on 2012 uninsured motorists’ claims. This is a 75 percent increase over the past 10 years, translating to $14 per insured individual in 2012.

According to Elizabeth A. Sprinkel, CPCU, senior vice president of the IRC, these numbers show that “responsible drivers who pay for insurance end up also paying for injuries caused by uninsured drivers.”

“The declining trend in the percentage of uninsured motorists is a positive development for consumers; however, the heightened levels of uninsured motorists and the rising claim payments involved still remain a concern for insured drivers, insurers and policymakers,” she said.

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Filed under Insurance Fraud